Hungarian Grand Prix increases year-on-year

Coverage of yesterday’s Hungarian Grand Prix increased marginally year-on-year, overnight ratings show. It is one of the few races recently where the ratings have remained in line with 2012 with the last three races seeing significant jumps.

Highlights of the race, screened on BBC One at 17:05 averaged 3.64 million viewers (24% share). There is nothing unusual about the number, except that it is identical to 2012’s highlights rating in the overnights! The share is different though, the 2012 showing averaging 20.3% throughout the broadcast. Sky Sports F1’s live coverage from 11:30 to 16:30 brought an average of 741,000 viewers (8.% share), which is up on the 658,000 viewers (5% share) in 2012. As I said last week, traditionally the Hungarian round performs above expectations due to the British good fortune at the race:

Hungarian Grand Prix – Official Ratings
2002 – 2.77 million
2003 – 2.73 million
2004 – 2.11 million
2005 – 2.79 million
2006 – 2.57 million
2007 – 3.37 million
2008 – 3.88 million
2009 – 4.83 million
2010 – 4.55 million
2011 – 4.76 million
2012 – 4.42 million / 4.67 million (using ‘35 percent theory‘)
– overnight figures were 4.30 million / 4.55 million
2013 – 4.38 million / 4.64 million (overnight rating)

For ease of confusion, some of you may be saying “the above shows 2012 above 2013, yet you’ve just said otherwise!”. When the 2013 official ratings come in, 2013 will end up marginally above 2012, as it is in the overnight ratings. A graphical version of the official ratings above can be found here in a post I wrote in June 2012 looking at the lowest Formula 1 ratings in the UK from the mid 2000’s. Qualifying had a combined BBC and Sky audience of 2.81 million viewers, making it comfortably the most watched Hungarian Qualifying session since records began (which means from 1996 onwards as that is when Qualifying for Hungary was consistently live). It also continues a trend where Qualifying is consistently bringing in between 2.6 million and 3.0 million viewers.

In a few weeks, I will be doing my mid-season ratings summary. Overall, ratings are up versus 2012. And, more impressively, they are up significantly more than you may think…

The 2012 Hungarian Grand Prix ratings report can be found here. Ratings are sourced from ITV Media.

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6 thoughts on “Hungarian Grand Prix increases year-on-year

    • For the highlights races, where it is possible to watch both, it is impossible to account for this as the information is not readily available in the public domain. Although I don’t have numbers, I would guess that it is a very, very small number (probably 10,000 or less) for it to make a significant difference.

    • You use the unique viewer metric … Combined viewing figures are like Peak viewing figures, not reliable, and tend to be used to manipulate the statistics, another trick is to misreport the length of a programme to bump up the averages, however this trick hurts the unique viewer figures slightly.

      • Am I right in saying though that unique viewer metric = the amount of viewers a program reached? I’m not a particular fan of the unique viewer metric for this reason, last year would have been higher as it had the Olympics lead-in which probably inflated the first five minutes of the F1 programme with non F1 viewers floating around still.

        Also, I wouldn’t say combined viewing figures are unreliable, it depends how you present the facts. Some people can use them for spinning, but as long as you use the same standard all along (as I have been), then the comparison is fair.

        It is difficult to me as well to use unique viewers as a figure in the report, because these are not freely available unfortunately.

      • A Unique viewer is someone who watches a set % of the programme (usually between 20 and 75% min), and is not counted when watching again, either a re-run or news clip or alternate broadcasts etc.

        ‘Verifiable Views’ are the average program audience, and can watch as little as 5%.

        But if you combine the broadcasts, shouldn’t all broadcasts be combined, like last nights re-run on the red button and the race repeats on BBC3, and all of Sky’s repeats, where do you stop? The historic races could be added to the previous numbers, thus bumping up GP figures from decades ago … That’s why combined figures have to be taken with more than just a pinch of salt.

        1 man 1 vote, 1 race watched 1 viewer.

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