In conversation with Marc Priestley

Ahead of Marc Priestley’s return to the Formula E paddock this weekend, I sat down with him at the AUTOSPORT show to chat all things motor sport from his technical background, through to his media activities in the past few years. We started the chat by talking about his early motor sport career.

MP: My fascination with motor sport like most people started by watching it on telly, I was always interested in Formula 1. I grew up living next door to Brands Hatch, which at the time was the venue for the British Grand Prix every other year. In our little village, the whole world used to descend on the place, and it drew me in. I couldn’t avoid it; you could hear the noise of the cars from where I lived. I guess it was inevitable looking back that I was going to be drawn towards motor sport.

I was doing a creative and artistic A Level course, nothing to do with engineering. At that point, it clicked in my head, I’m going down this route of education that I don’t really want to do. Motor sport is my ultimate fascination, so why not work in it. I went home; I remember having a discussion with the parents saying that I want to ditch my A Levels. They thought I was crazy!

I switched onto an engineering course at the same college. In the meantime, I started making as many contacts through the people in the village that I knew that were involved loosely. I did a number of work experience opportunities, with different teams in the lower categories. I absolutely loved it.

My friends always dreamt of being racing drivers, which was the natural thing to do, but something in my mind wanted to be part of a pit stop crew. It was the teamwork, and the engineering that I became obsessed with, so that’s why I ended up on this route towards Formula 1. I went through the various rungs on the ladder, Formula Ford, Formula 3, Formula 3000 and then eventually onto Formula 1. It was a dream come true.

F1B: As you stepped the ladder, the pressure grows a bit, the paddock changes slightly. How did you adjust from going to a paddock of 50 people to say a paddock of 500, did it feel like there was more pressure?

MP: The step up to Formula 1 is a big, big step. Each step towards that is a relatively minor step. The step, even from Formula 3000 is a big step up just because the teams in Formula 1 are so enormous. I was suddenly in the McLaren garage that I had been watching on telly in awe of just two weeks before. Now I was dressed in the same gear, and I was with these guys. I knew there were millions of people watching these pit stops.

The pressure is the single biggest thing you have to find a way to deal with. There’s no training for it, the teams don’t have a mechanism to ease you into the pressure, you’re kind of thrown in. Some people deal with it and I have seen people who can’t. You have to be the right type of person to be able to handle that sort of situation. Strangely, I thrived on it, every time we had a pit stop, even in my final year after being in Formula 1 for ten years; the adrenaline rush of a pit stop was just amazing.

F1B: McLaren was your only Formula 1 team, but were you tempted by any switches along the way?

MP: I very nearly went to Ferrari in 2007. When Kimi [Raikkonen] left to go to Ferrari, I’d been working with him for many years. My very good friend and his personal trainer Mark Arnall went with him to Ferrari, and a few of us had discussions with Kimi and talked about going over as well. It was something that I toyed with. I was on the verge of going out there for a meeting, to have a look around and talk about it further, but in the end I decided not to, mostly for personal reasons. It would have been a huge adventure, but I was probably less risk adverse at that time than I would have been 15 years earlier.

F1B: At McLaren you worked with various different drivers, Raikkonen, David Coulthard, Mika Hakkinen, so on and so forth. How did you manage to control the media element, with a lot of high-profile drivers comes, not necessarily ego, but a bit of ‘baggage’ along the way?

MP: It does, with some much more than others. The media department within McLaren deals with it, so there is a team of people to handle that. The drivers handle it all very differently. Someone like Kimi is incredibly low maintenance he has no ego. I know the media have a love-hate relationship with him, but when you’re working with that in a team, you love that because you know he’s not playing up to the camera, he’s not giving off any false persona when he’s doing an interview. He’s the same guy in front of the camera as he is in the garage, or when he’s having a beer away from the track, and I love that.

Others feel like they have to give off a certain image, and that’s the more common trait amongst Formula 1 drivers and I think Formula 1 does that a little bit to people. It’s a very corporate world, more so at McLaren, you always feel like you have to give off the right image, even if that’s not your natural image. That’s sometimes quite hard to curb. I used to push the boundaries; Ron Dennis hated that because if the media saw it then it would ruin the team’s reputation. You have to be slightly careful; I came close a few times! In terms of working with drivers, it utterly depends on whom you have and whom you’re working with at any given time.

F1B: Did you find that if there was media attention for a certain driver that you would just have to try to block it out?

MP: Yeah, absolutely. When I was a mechanic, I had a lot of friends in the media. When there’s a story breaking, you can sense that these people, who are your friends, but work in the media, they want a story. At that point, the friendship has to change because you have to be slightly guarded in what you give off, you can’t give out too many secrets and also they’re just your friends. There is a fine balance, and particularly when I left the team and moved into the media myself, I noticed that from my [McLaren] friends and former colleagues. It’s a shame that happens slightly, you go back to square one having to build up the trust with your friends again, knowing that you’re not going to betray their confidence if they tell you something.

F1B: How was 2007 from the media point of view?

MP: It was horrible, a negative year other than the fact that we had a very quick car and two quick drivers, those were the positives. Everything else was negative. The drivers were fighting, the team was fighting and we had the spygate case going on in the background, which was a global news story. We were found guilty and thrown out the championship. There was negativity everywhere. As a mechanic, being part of that team, you feel like that takes you and your reputation down. I had nothing to do with any of that stuff, the spygate stuff was nothing to do with any of us in the garage, but you can’t help feel like that the media or people watching on associate anyone wearing a McLaren shirt with the bad press and cheating. It was my most difficult year in motor sport. We should have walked away with both championships. The media love a story like that, so when you’re in the middle of it, it’s very difficult to try to park that to one side and to get on with the job. It’s difficult anyway with people trying to take the whole team down at times.

F1B: In hindsight, is it just one of those things that you have to accept “it will happen” with two fast drivers, or is there anything you can do to stop it?

MP: It’s very difficult to avoid, and to a degree, you want to a bit of it. When your biggest competitor is the other side of the garage, you have to fight against him. I think one of the interesting things will be is if we get the likes of Max Verstappen and Daniel Ricciardo fighting for the championship, the media will try to stir it up. So far, they’ve been great mates and have got on very, very well, have bounced off each other nicely yet pushed each other hard and fairly.

Each one of these situations, which doesn’t come around that often, is a case study. Lewis and Nico will have undoubtedly learnt from Lewis and Fernando with us. And if it turns out to be Red Bull’s turn next, they will learn from what the guys have done before them. I don’t think there’s any real magic answer as to how to deal with it, I thought Mercedes actually did a good job over handling what can be a very difficult situation to be in. They’ve been pretty open and honest about their drivers, with their drivers and with the public about what was going on. I think that’s all you can do.

F1B: After McLaren, you moved into the media spotlight, and you’ve been there since.

MP: Yeah, I’ve absolutely loved it. When it came to the point that we had won the championship with Lewis Hamilton in 2008, in 2009 I had started to think about what I would do after leaving the team. I realised that I had all of these stories, all of this knowledge and experience from my many years in the team that fans love to hear about it. It started by writing a blog at first, that’s how it really got going. It was the fans reaction to the stuff that I was writing, and the rest of the media’s reaction, that spurred me on. I realised how much insight I had that people wanted to hear about.

It was the producers of the BBC 5 Live Formula 1 radio show that noticed my writing and took me in as a pit lane reporter back in 2012. I was alongside Jennie Gow, absolutely loved it, realised that was where I wanted to go with my career next, so set about really trying to get to where I am now. I love Formula 1, I’ve always loved motor sport in general and I love being able to try to explain to people what’s going on, why things are going on, how things work. I think I have a technical understanding from an engineering background, so to be able to try to translate that into perhaps more simple terms for some people and keep it intricate for others is quite a fine balance and a difficult thing to do. I like to think it’s something I’m reasonably good at!

F1B: You should be in hot demand this year, considering the amount of changes that we have. Viewers will turn on in Australia and think, “Those cars are different”, but quite a few will want to know why.

MP: Absolutely, I hope so. Times like this are exciting for me because of the big technical changes in the sport. Things like Formula E, which is brand new and need total explanation, because they’re completely different from what everybody understands as a racing car, I love that. I love innovation, and trying to explain innovation and both Formula 1 and Formula E are at the forefront of that, so to be involved in both is a dream come true.

F1B: How have you found the Formula E journey so far, this year is its third year.

MP: I’m a massive fan. I understand from a traditionalist point of view, the fans that say they want screaming engines, burning rubber and noise, but I’m more of the view that we need to move forward. Let’s embrace something that is futuristic with technology that no one has seen before, that no one has pushed to the limits before. We’re sat here in front of a line-up on 1970s [Lotus] Formula 1 cars, these things made incredible noise, but you can’t cling onto that forever.

You’ve got to move forward, so I absolutely applaud Formula E for taking the plunge. You could argue that they went in early; maybe the technology and fans weren’t quite ready. They’ve continued with it and I think they’ve done an incredible job of making a great show, taking it to some amazing places. I’m fascinated to see where it goes from here, they’ve got a blank canvas to do anything and that’s something Formula 1 doesn’t necessarily have. Formula 1 can’t take a giant leap in the opposite direction, it’s like an enormous container ship trying to change direction, it has to do it slowly. It has so many fans that they need to be edged into new technology and change. Formula E doesn’t have that, they can do whatever they want and I think these are really exciting times.

F1B: How long do you think it will take Formula E, both in terms of the championship, but also the media and the audience perspective to mature? At the moment, it’s still a very immature product.

MP: It is. But you can see from the number of major auto manufactures that are now getting on-board, a number that’s increasing all the time over the last six months. We have some major players coming on-board. That tells you the level of potential that this series has got. Big names like BMW, Audi, Renault, DS Citroen and Jaguar. Those big names are the names that people out there watching, flicking through the channels, they recognise those names. The names being associated with Formula E gives the championship extra credence, and people will begin to believe in it even more. That’s where Formula E needed to get to, and it’s promising that is genuinely now starting to happen.

F1B: Lastly, what are your plans for 2017, what do you have lined up?

MP: Well I sat at home just last week, having had a month’s rest, looking at my schedule for 2017 and it’s crazy. I’m doing most Formula 1 races with Sky, I’m doing every Formula E race now with Formula E itself, and a load of other things in between, some of which I can’t say at the moment! 2017 is looking like a really exciting year for me, a very busy one. I’m really excited for it.

My thanks go to Marc Priestley for spending the time with me on the above interview.

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Scheduling: The 2017 Buenos Aires ePrix

After an extended absence, Formula E returns for the second half of its third season with the Buenos Aires ePrix.

Returning to the fray are two names familiar to site readers. Jack Nicholls returns as lead commentator for this round having been absent from the Hong Kong and Marrakech ePrix due to his BBC Radio 5 Live F1 commitments. Nicholls will be around for the Mexican ePrix on April 1st, before missing the Monaco and Berlin ePrix.

Marc Priestley is the second name returning to the fold, in a move officially confirmed on the Formula E website. Priestley replaces Ben Constanduros as Formula E’s YouTube presenter. Priestley has previously been part of ITV’s Formula E coverage when they were the UK broadcaster, but never part of the host feed’s coverage. It is a good move to bring Priestley into the picture.

Channel 5’s sister channel Spike is airing live coverage of qualifying, with the main channel airing the race live, which should be a good shop window for the championship in primetime next Saturday. The channel will cut away from the World Feed before the end of the post-race analysis, finishing slightly earlier at 20:10. After this race, there will be a further six week break until the Mexico City ePrix on April 1st.

Formula E – Buenos Aires (online via Channel 5’s social media channels and YouTube)
18/02 – 10:55 to 11:55 – Practice 1
18/02 – 13:25 to 14:10 – Practice 2

Formula E – Buenos Aires
18/02 – 14:45 to 16:20 – Qualifying (Spike)
18/02 – 18:30 to 20:15 – Race (Channel 5)

If anything changes, I will update the above schedule.

Update on February 17th – In a u-turn, It looks like Channel 5 are adding a studio element, with Andy Jaye confirming on Twitter that he will be presenting tomorrow’s live race broadcast.

Scheduling: The 2017 Barcelona test 1 on Sky Sports F1

One of the most frantic winter periods in recent Formula 1 history is ending. On February 27th, 2017 the sound of Formula 1 machinery will again be heard as the drivers and teams head to Barcelona in Spain for the first pre-season test session!

Sky Sports F1 will be covering the action, with brief interviews interspersed with track footage on each of the four days, followed by Ted Kravitz’s usual Notebook material. Sky Sports News will also have their usual reporter (either Rachel Brookes or Craig Slater) at the circuit.

Given that the sport is now under the ownership of Liberty Media, we might see more activity than previous years from Formula One Management (FOM) at these tests. As of writing, I do not know if they have any new plans for covering testing as a whole, but I will update this post if they are planning to do something different this year.

On the subject of car launches, there is nothing currently in Sky’s schedules. However, Natalie Pinkham and David Croft are presenting the Force India car launch from Silverstone on February 22nd, so I would expect something to turn up on the channel. Likewise, I would be surprised if the Mercedes launch the following day was not covered, either.

The Barcelona test one schedule currently stands as follows:

Thursday 16th February
19:30 to 20:30 – Preview (BBC Radio 5 Live)

Wednesday 22nd February
13:00 to 16:00 – Afternoon Edition (BBC Radio 5 Live)
live from the Mercedes factory with Jack Nicholls

Monday 27th February
21:00 to 21:45 – Day 1 Highlights (Sky Sports F1)
– round-up at 21:00
– Ted’s Notebook at 21:15

Tuesday 28th February
20:15 to 21:00 – Day 1 Highlights (Sky Sports F1) (R)
21:00 to 21:45 – Day 2 Highlights (Sky Sports F1)
– round-up at 21:00
– Ted’s Notebook at 21:15

Wednesday 1st March
20:15 to 21:00 – Day 2 Highlights (Sky Sports F1) (R)
21:00 to 21:45 – Day 3 Highlights (Sky Sports F1)
– round-up at 21:00
– Ted’s Notebook at 21:15

Thursday 2nd March
20:15 to 21:00 – Day 3 Highlights (Sky Sports F1) (R)
21:00 to 21:45 – Day 4 Highlights (Sky Sports F1)
– round-up at 21:00
– Ted’s Notebook at 21:15

If anything changes, I will update the schedule above.

Update on February 15th – The BBC are airing a 5 Live Formula 1 special on Thursday 16th February with Jennie Gow, Mark Gallagher, Andrew Benson, Toto Wolff, Ross Brawn and Claire Williams.

Flashback: 2005 United States Grand Prix

To celebrate the fifth anniversary of The F1 Broadcasting Blog, we are looking back at five races from the archive and chewing over them. Being a broadcasting site, these races are not being analysed from a racing standpoint, but instead from a media perspective.

The five races include Grand Prix from the BBC and ITV eras, crossing over from the Americas, into Europe and Australia. Some races picked are your usual affair, whilst others have major significance in Formula 1 history. I did think about looking at five ‘major’ races, but each race has equal merit from a broadcasting standpoint, irrespective of how great the race was.

Race three takes us to North America and the 2005 United States Grand Prix! The 2005 season was a real turning point for Formula 1, with the Schumacher era of 2000 to 2004 now consigned to the history books. 2005 was the time for the likes of Fernando Alonso and Kimi Raikkonen to come to the forefront and shine. The previous weekend in Canada, Raikkonen reduced his gap to Alonso and hoped to do so again at Indianapolis.

But, if you have come this far, you know that for Formula 1, the weekend of June 17th, 18th and 19th in 2005 was no ordinary weekend… The key broadcast details can be found below:

  • Date: Sunday 19th June 2005
  • Channel: ITV1
  • Presenter: Jim Rosenthal
  • Reporter: Louise Goodman
  • Reporter: Ted Kravitz
  • Commentator: James Allen
  • Commentator: Martin Brundle
  • Analyst: Mark Blundell

Back in 2005, smartphones were not really a thing. MySpace was the major social media player in its early stages. On the TV front, live coverage of North American qualifying sessions on ITV certainly was not a thing. The first I heard of any problems in USA was by tuning in to ITV’s race broadcast. Arguably, the US Grand Prix broadcast was ITV’s finest hour.

Pre-Race
“You Ain’t Seen Nothing Yet” by Bachman–Turner Overdrive is an apt song for the opening titles, given the events that are about to unfold. “This is definitely not Formula 1’s finest hour. As it stands, I cannot tell you whether there’s going to be a Grand Prix or not,” Jim Rosenthal says during his introduction. Rosenthal outlined the key issues from the outset, hinting at the possibility of a new chicane prior to the final bend, thus preventing Michelin’s tyres from failing.

We hear from ITV’s pit lane reporters Ted Kravitz and Louise Goodman heavily throughout the build-up, more so than Rosenthal and Mark Blundell. In the first half of the programme, Kravitz updates viewers from various locations, eavesdropping on Tony George’s office. In my opinion, this build-up is the start of the on-screen Kravitz that we see today. Most of his time on-screen until this point since 2002 had been the usual interview based material, but USA 2005 was a completely new challenge for all concerned.

2005-usa-gp-flavio-and-bernie
Renault’s Flavio Briatore and FOM’s Bernie Ecclestone in animated disagreement.

There are many hard-hitting interviews in the build-up, with the likes of Minardi team boss Paul Stoddart, Ferrari communications officer Luca Colajanni and Sir Jackie Stewart interviewed. Colajanni’s interview with Goodman does not reveal too much, but her pieces with Stoddart throughout the programme were damming. “If ever there was a time for Formula 1 to come together and leave the bloody politics behind, now is the time,” Stoddart said. Every anecdote revealed a new piece of information: Stewart in his interview mentioned potential lawsuits should the Michelin teams start the race.

Rosenthal and Blundell hold together the programme between the various interviews, discussing Formula 1’s future in America. Their discussion is a sideshow to the pictures, which show the gravity of the situation, paddock characters in heated conversation. Furthermore, not once have ITV shown viewers the qualifying order, or any features taped before the race weekend. The running order truly ripped up. The only feature that aired was a lap of Indianapolis on-board with McLaren driver Kimi Raikkonen. Rosenthal and Blundell analyse a slower version of the lap, showing the proposed location of the chicane. If the events of 2005 occurred in 2016, I think broadcasters would have used a broader range of material to cover the tyre issues, including the use of virtual graphics to show where they was failing.

2005-usa-gp-grid-walk
Bernie Ecclestone tries to explain the situation to ITV’s Martin Brundle.

As we approach race start, you can feel the anxiety increase as people realise that the building work is not happening any time soon. Martin Brundle joined the programme towards race time, Brundle recollecting his experiences from 1994 following Ayrton Senna and Roland Ratzenberger’s deaths when the GPDA and the FIA made changes to multiple tracks. The FIA made the changes prior to the race weekend, which was not the case with USA 2005.

The grid walk with Brundle is different, who “doesn’t know whether to laugh or cry.” Brundle’s first grid interview is with Ecclestone. I wonder what Chase Carey would say in a similar situation…

MB – It looks like only four cars are going to start this race.

BE – Well there’s a lot more cars here. They’re all here [on the grid].

MB – I’m told that maybe even the Minardi’s will peel off at the end of the warm-up lap and just four cars will come down to the start line itself, they may be all here at the moment.

BE – Well, you know, so why you asking me.

MB – Well I want to know if I’m right or not.

BE – You wait and see.

MB – They can’t go round the track, they’ve been told they can’t go flat out and if they go slow, it’s more dangerous. You can’t have 14 cars effectively driving a different race track.

BE – The problem has been caused by the tyres, Michelin brought the wrong tyres. It’s as simple as that.

MB – But in the interests of Formula 1, you must have been screaming at the lot of them to say “sort yourselves out, I’m taking charge here.”

BE – Yeah, but the difference is you can’t tell people to do something when the tyre company says that you can’t race on those tyres.

MB – Did we need some more control on the paperwork that’s been flying about and the meetings, could we not bang some heads together and get this sorted out last night, why are we standing on the grid talking about this. You’re asking me and I’m asking you what’s going on!

BE – I wish I knew. The problem is simple, there’s not the tyres here where the tyre company is confident that those tyres are okay to use, especially on that banking.

MB – The future of Formula 1 in America, the future of Michelin in Formula 1?

BE – Not good.

MB – On both counts?

BE – Both counts.

MB – And what will happen this week, will they be slapped in some court?

BE – Well we’ll have to see. It’s early days, we don’t know. I feel sorry for the public, I feel sorry for the promoter here.

MB – I feel sorry for my eight million mates sitting at home, looking forward to a good Grand Prix. It’s too late now, we’ve ran out of time.

BE – We’ll see what happens now. People shouldn’t give up on Formula 1 because of this one incident. The incident is not the fault of the teams.

There is a lot more, Brundle even trying to doorstep the other Ecclestone. She has “nothing to say”; he says they need a “jolly good slapping!” On this day in history, I agree. Kravitz grabbed a final word with Michelin’s Nick Shorrock, who did the equivalent of no comment. Rosenthal and Blundell are pretty damning with their verdict, even before the formation lap gets underway.

Race
ITV did not take a break immediately before the five-minute World Feed sting, choosing to take the break later on knowing that the race would be quiet. James Allen noted that the majority of the crowd have “no idea” what is happening, which is clear as we head into the race itself. Allen recites the story so far, highlighting the key arguments from both Michelin’s and Bridgestone’s perspective. And into the formation lap we head, Brundle stating that he doesn’t want a “half-hearted start” as it would be “plain dangerous”.

2005-usa-gp-start
Farce.

If you watched the race live, you know what happens next. “Okay mate, you know what the plan is for the start, straight into the pits please mate,” is the message for Renault driver Fernando Alonso. 14 of the 20 cars peel off into pit lane. “It’s the strangest race ever, and it gets underway, now!” Allen described the crowd as sitting in “stunned silence.” Quite clearly, the director has an easy job with not many cars to focus on. Ferrari, Ferrari, Jordan, Minardi, Jordan and Minardi are the top six, the only six.

A six-car race is not an appetising affair. Many television stations agreed and pulled the race off air. ITV disagreed, and instead used a mixture of their own cameras in paddock and the World Feed for the duration. The first in-depth conversation came as early as lap two; Goodman interviewed Coulthard who described it as a “very sad day for the sport.” In total, ITV aired 13 interviews during the race. The silence turned to audible boos at sporadic phases throughout the race, a small minority at one stage hurled bottles onto the circuit.

ITV recognised that there was a human element outside of the microcosm of the paddock, and with that, the broadcaster headed into the fan zone, fans stating that they will not watch Formula 1 at Indianapolis again, shouting “refund!” It was a rare, sublime piece of broadcasting that no doubt kept viewers watching for the majority of the programme, even though there was very little to watch on track.

I remember standing on the grid in Adelaide [1991] when it was pouring with rain. [Ayrton] Senna wanted to race, [Alain] Prost didn’t, most of the rest of us were unsure. Bernie Ecclestone walked down the grid and said “get in your car,” the race is about to start. That was pretty much how it worked in those days, but that strategy wouldn’t have worked today because of this critical problem with the tyres and liability. – ITV co-commentator Martin Brundle

Brundle and Allen discussed previous scenarios, such as the 1991 Australian Grand Prix when heavy rain stopped the race and the FISA-FOCA war in the early 1980s where Formula 1 saw a depleted running order. They also noted that the attention was not as enormous as 2005. “It’s a different world now,” says Allen. Allen’s journalistic ability shines during the race, with his ability to explain a technical matter to a casual audience, whilst adding new snippets of information to the story (for example Bridgestone’s advantage after Firestone tyres were used on the “abrasive” Indianapolis 500 surface three weeks earlier).

The commentators also bring into play the political games that are happening in the paddock, such as a proposed breakaway series. Kravitz outlined a “single tyre formula” that was mentioned in 2008 documentation circulated prior to the race weekend, a move that ended up being implemented in 2007. This kind of discussion never occurs during the race, showing how unique the race was.

2005-usa-gp-paul-stoddart-pre-race
Minardi’s Paul Stoddart addresses the world’s media

For Minardi and Jordan, the 2005 United States Grand Prix was their lucky day, with the World Feed director not having much else to focus on. Every second on-screen for them meant extra money and points. Nevertheless, Minardi boss Paul Stoddart gave a very passionate interview to ITV about the direction of Formula 1, about how the FIA are “meddling” with the regulations. Out in front, Barrichello leapfrogged Schumacher in the first round of pit stops. Despite Ferrari’s best efforts, the battle between the two drivers is not really a race, even if the two did nearly collide at one stage as Schumacher regained the lead after the second round of stops.

After 73 laps, in the strangest of circumstances, Schumacher wins the US Grand Prix!

Post-Race
Brundle remarked, “If Michael does a victory leap on the podium, I’m going to go and personally punch him.”

The usual post-race chatter begins on the warm down lap with Allen and Brundle looking forward to racing matters, starting with the French Grand Prix. Whistles and boos clearly heard in the background from the crowd as the podium ceremony starts (which ITV manage to miss, a very minor blot on their copy book).

A tricky event, but from a broadcasting perspective it was a blinding event to work on. It was the epitome of live television. As we went on-air, we ripped up the running order because we didn’t know what was going to happen. All of the features that we’d been carefully filming and putting together over the previous two days went out the window. The story had changed massively and we had to reflect that story, but we still didn’t know which direction the story was going to go in. We didn’t know whether there was going to be a race, how cars were going to be racing, what’s going to happen. The buzz of being involved in that was just phenomenal. – In conversation with Louise Goodman (Part One and Part Two)

Portuguese’s Tiago Monteiro enjoyed his moment in the sun having finished third; Schumacher and Barrichello headed straight off the podium. Blundell and Rosenthal react to what they have seen before them with some brief analysis of the Ferrari kerfuffle. The viewers hear more reaction from fans leaving the circuit with more “refund!” chants, followed by the start of the FIA press conference.

Rosenthal wrapped up the programme, stating, “We’ve seen an F1 fiasco in peak time, like David Coulthard, I feel sick and embarrassed to my stomach, circumstances beyond our control. We can only say sorry. Goodnight.”